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Performances

Listening for New Ground
World Listening Day Performance by Wendalyn Bartley
July 15, 2017, 8:00 pm to 9:30 pm
NAISA North Media Arts Centre, 106 Ottawa Ave, South River, ON
General $10
This performance in celebration of World Listening Day features the Premiere of Bartley's soundscape work A Forest Oracle, developed during a residency at Warbler's Roost. Bartley will also lead audiences in a sound walk followed by a participatory performance of Pauline Oliveros’ sonic meditation "Environmental Dialogue." World Listening Day is a world-wide initiative led by the World Listening Project to promote awareness and education on the soundscape. This year’s activities honour the work of Pauline Oliveros with the theme "Listening to the Ground". The performance follows a 1 PM workshop by Bartley called Listening for New Ground.
Nova Concert
August 8, 2017, 8:00 pm
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph Street, Toronto
A performance of new works by Allison Cameron, Bekah Ann Simms, and Mehrnaz Rohbakhsh are presented as part of the Turbulent Forms exhibition. These works will be developed through a workshop with Dan Tapper and will be presented alongside a program of Tapper's work and the unveiling of his installation Nova, which maps the histories of supernova events through light and sound.
Toronto Electroacoustic Symposium Concerts
August 9, 2017 to August 12, 2017
Aug 9 & 10 @ 7:30 PM Aug 10, 11 & 12 @ 3:30 PM
Ernest Balmer Studio, 9 Trinity Street, #315, Toronto (Case Goods Building, Distillery District)
General $15, Students $10, or free with TIES registration
This series of TIES concerts include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.
Sound Travels Concert: Object Response
Performances by Sonia Paço-Rocchia and Alan Bloor
August 11, 2017, 7:30 pm
Ernest Balmer Studio, 9 Trinity Street, #315, Toronto (Case Goods Building, Distillery District), Toronto
General $15, Students $10, or free with TIES registration!
Object Response is a performance by Sonia Paço-Rocchia from Montreal and Alan Bloor from Toronto where saw blades and other industrial tools are transformed into live electroacoustic instruments. This performance will explore the full dynamic and timbral range of these resonant acoustic sources.

Program:
I. Scies by Sonia Paço-Rocchia
A performance for sound automatons made from saw blades, musical saw, stemsaw, other instruments derived from blades and live electronics. Scies: You never saw a performance like this.
II. Dual Abrasives by Alan Bloor
The performance, Dual Abrasives, will compare two (of many) sound projects of Alan Bloor: Knurl and Pholde. Both of these projects use the treated analog sounds of metals cultures from found objects.

Knurl, began in 1994, as an idea to capture the very harsh and abrasive sounds of the welding shops in which Bloor worked. Pholde, which was initiated in 2002,
has a more suspenseful, "ambient" sound. In this project, Bloor uses the natural resonances of the metal.

This evening's performance will concentrate mainly on sounds from saw blades.
Sound Travels Concert: Time Response
Performance by Chantal Dumas, Stijn Demeulenaere, and Bran Connolly
August 12, 2017, 7:30 pm
Ernest Balmer Studio, 9 Trinity Street, #315, Toronto (Case Goods Building, Distillery District), Toronto
General $15, Students $10, or free with TIES registration!
Time is fundamental to perceiving sound and has been a topic for many sound art works. This concert includes works that contemplate time in very different ways. Chantal Dumas’ Nazca Plate is an attempt to translate the slow movement of the dynamic Earth into sound. Stijn Demeulenaere’s video work Nothing’s going to happen to us… examines the reconstruction of a single event in time – an armed conflict - told by the person who experienced it first hand. Brian Connally's octaphonic work Track deals with time on a more micro level where micro changes in time produce acoustic beating and other psychoacoustic effects.

Program:
I. ‘Nothing’s going to happen to us...' by Stijn Demeulenaere
'Nothing’s going to happen to us...' investigates how our perceptions of an armed conflict relate to a lived reality. Memories of a bombardment are confronted with the views of sound designers on such an experience. These voices are structured by the sounds of conflicts worldwide. 'Nothing’s going to happen to us...' explores the tensions between a lived experience of an armed conflict, and our (re-)presentation of such a conflict. It does so by examining how we interpret sounds in those high alert moments. What they mean to us. How we respond to sounds in different situations, as different audiences. Please note that the presentation shown tonight was originally presented as an installation.
II. Track by Brian Connolly
Over two short movements Track exploits the non-linear nature of the inner ear in relation to the phenomenon of pitch perception within complex non-periodic sounds. Through both knowledge of bandwidth phenomena in relation to basilar membrane functions of the inner ear combined with specific equalisation, filtering and spectral masking procedures, this work involves the generation of formant regions with specific centre frequencies and modulating bandwidths which the listener's ears will unintentionally track throughout the duration of the piece.

As the listener's ears become instruments in the performance of this piece, a bridge is formed between the physicality of the listener and the loudspeakers with the sound waves now behaving as sonic stimuli which place the inner ear of the listener at the forefront of the work itself.
III. Nazca plate [sound essay on geological time ] by Chantal Dumas
I have always been interested in maps. In these representations of the world, I see an invitation to discover it through various aspects. When I wanted to compose pieces on the topic of time, maps supplied me with an entry point. In an earlier piece of mine, 86,400 Second Time Zones, the division of time zones served as a guide for the counting of seconds contained in a day. In this new piece, a physical map of the earth became the means of interpretation for geological time.

The Nazca Plate is an attempt to translate the Dynamic Earth into sound. The composition is based on the activity of the oceanic Nazca plate, in the latitudes of South America.

This piece was made With the participation of Ida Toninato, baritone saxophone.