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Performances

Sounds Lost and Found - World Listening Day Concert
Co-presented with the Canadian Music Centre
By Fleshtone Aura, Victoria Fenner and David Jesenius
July 16, 2016, 8:00 pm
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph Street, Toronto, ON
General $10
As part of World Listening Day, three composers and sound artists – Fleshtone Aura, Victoria Fenner and David Jesenius have been invited by NAISA and the Candian Music Centre to create multichannel soundscape pieces on the theme of Sounds Lost and Found. All of the sound materials for the pieces will be drawn from the soundscape apps/sites Found Sound and Radio Aporee.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #1
August 10, 2016, 8:00 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The first of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #2
August 11, 2016, 2:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The second of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #3
August 11, 2016, 8:00 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The third of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.
Sound Travels Concert: Two Retrospectives: John Oswald and Paul Dolden
By John Oswald and Paul Dolden
August 12, 2016, 8:00 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
In this concert, works by John Oswald and Paul Dolden - two highly individual and distinguished Canadian artists - will trace how they approach the concept of sonic density through their original use of multi-tracking recording techniques since the 1970’s. Included will be the world premiere by Paul Dolden of Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt, a new work commissioned by NAISA with funding from the Canada Council for the Arts, part of his full length work Music of Another Present Era as well as his works: Below the Walls of Jericho, L’ivresse de la vitesse, and an excerpt from Who Has the Biggest Sound. Also included will be the following works by John Oswald: Vertical Time, DAB, Skindling Shade?s, and Global Wilderness.

Program:
I. Music of Another Present Era by Paul Dolden
Music of Another Present Era plays freely with our ability to imagine another time and culture. At the same time, it recognizes that this historical imagining is necessarily conditioned by our own time and place.

This work appropriates a number of ancient tuning systems to create a sense of the past within our present era.

This is not a programmatic work; instead, these stories appear in the music metaphorically. This metaphoric use of myths is so that the musical content be recognized without it being diminished or reduced.

*Part 1 and 2 commissioned by Akousma (Montreal). Entr’acte and Air of the Rainbow Robe.... were commissioned by New Adventures in Sound Art (Toronto). The Cosmic Circle Dance was commissioned by Klang Festival Montpellier France. All commissions are with the financial assistance of the Canada Council for the Arts.
II. Who can talk Faster: Crickets or Man (an excerpt from Who Has the Biggest Sound?) by Paul Dolden
In “Who Has the Biggest Sound?” our composer pursues the important questions of the day: Who has the biggest sound?, Who has the nicest melodies?, Who can play the fastest?, and Who has the most complex music? During this quest for the musical Holy Grail the composer is impeded by the sounds of nature.
III. Vertical Time (1973, restoration and revision 2012) by John Oswald
These were the ideas i set out to experience in the concocting of Vertical Time in 1973.

-  An idea of black noise.

-  A mediation from the pure simplicity of a single sine tone to the pure complexity of white noise.

-  An aural tapestry intended to compliment visual fields generated from television snow.

-  A mass or cloud of sound that one could move around or through, thus hearing different perspectives of a continuous presence.

The final sonic environment is achieved through many things, including thick and busy white noise with thousands of sine tones, changing the playback speed of an accumulation of these tones, a swarm of sweeping pitches, a mass of very short blips of pitches, and coloured variations of the sounds.

In the end i never finalized a composite mix of Vertical Time back then, preferring to have it sound different each playback with the staggering starts of unsynchronized tapes and synth. Almost 40 years later now i've reassembled these parts, recreating some portions which weren't recorded at the time.

The structure of Vertical Time is based on the banana split sundaes that were (and still are) available at Dairy Queen ice cream stands: three varied peaks and a unifying throughline (the split stereo banana).

*With the help of Chris Muir and John Abram, and the encouragement of Barry Truax.
IV. Skindling Shadés by John Oswald
Co-incidentally the composer was gathering recordings of incendiary sounds at the same time choreographers Paula Ravitz and Denise Fujiwara were working on a solo of combustible images, while using, as rehearsal music, a recording of Igor Stravinsky's The Firebird. The co-choreographers asked John Oswald to make a replacement to The Firebird and he had no intention to imitate Stravinsky.

In addition to actual fire recordings, there are similar sounds (the moving of air, the escaping of gases, the fracture of timber), tromp l'orielle and heat noise swarms. The composer refers to a swarm as a massive overdubbing of a single sound source.
V. DAB by John Oswald
From “BAD RELATIONS: plunderography, pop and weird in DAB.”
The source for DAB is entirely the Jackson/Jones/Swedien pop song 'Bad' (Epic EK 40600 DIDP 70643). The transformations come from a limited pallet, which excludes timbral signal processing (filtering, modulation, supplementary synthesis, etc.) pitch shifting, delay reverberation and add-on musicianship. What is left is location in time. Fractional portions of the original music, varying in duration from about 25 milliseconds to phonemes and sonemes, to phrase fragments, have been superimposed and re-juxtaposed in 3 specified sections without pause: Revised, a bridge, and Homogenized.

DAB varies between a general similarity to its source material and abstraction. It also mediates between pop/rock predictability, the rhythmic idiosyncrasy available to improvisers, and the timbral meditations found in the electroacoustic genre. Totally mechanical routines have been applied to the realizations of musicians who have the studio time to seek perfection. Perfection has been messed with by improvisation. Very popular music meets its extremities.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #4
August 13, 2016, 2:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The fourth of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #5
August 13, 2016, 8:00 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The last of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world.