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Performances

Sounds Lost and Found - World Listening Day Concert
Co-presented with the Canadian Music Centre
By Andrew Zukerman / Fleshtone Aura, Victoria Fenner and David Jensenius
July 16, 2016, 8:00 pm
Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph Street, Toronto, ON
General $10
As part of World Listening Day, three composers and sound artists – Victoria Fenner, David Jensenius, and Fleshtone Aura (Andrew Zukerman) - have been invited by NAISA and the Candian Music Centre to create multichannel soundscape pieces on the theme of Sounds Lost and Found. All of the sound materials for the pieces will be drawn from the soundscape apps/sites Found Sound and Radio Aporee.

Tickets available through the CMC:
https://musiccentre.secure.force.com/ticket/#sections_a0F1a000004EPYzEAO

Program:
I. I Can Hear for 100 Miles by David Jensenius
A new composition using sounds recorded from the Found Sounds archive. David Jensenius is the developer of Found Sound, an iOS app for mobile soundscape recording and listening.
II. Station Breaks by Victoria Fenner
It's December of 1982. It's a long bus ride between Toronto and Vancouver with only a radio for company. Between the Static is a collection of radio stations which punctuated long distances of airwaves between settlements in the sparsely populated land mass called Canada thirty years ago. In between stations, life outside the bus.
III. Dish Song by Andrew Zukerman / Fleshtone Aura
Dish Song consists of two discernable elements - field recordings of birds & insects from the Radio Aporee archive and fragments of music sourced from various elementary to middle school choir records. Using electronic and concrete methods the source material is processed and re-recorded to the brink of total abstraction. Reconstituted into a tonal mulch, the material is played back live using tape players, samplers and modular synthesizer through NAISA's Spatialization System.

Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #1
August 10, 2016, 7:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The first of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world. Included on the concert are works by Jerod Sommerfeldt, Matt Wellins, John Thompson, Barbara Finck-Beccafico, Jean-Paul Perrotte, Mei Hang, Nathaniel Haering, Ursula Meyer-Koenig, Brian Connolly, Elizabeth Hoffman, Mirko Ettore D’Agostino and Kiran Bhumber.
TIES 2016 is sponsored by FACTOR.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #2
August 11, 2016, 7:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The second of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world. Included on the concert are works by Elliott Grabill, Dan Tapper, Thomas Dempster, Bret Bohman, Xavier Madore, Jane/Kin, John Mayrose, Kyle Stewart, Eddie Far, Kerry L Hagan, Gordon Delap and Guillaume Loizillon.
TIES 2016 is sponsored by FACTOR.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #3
August 12, 2016, 3:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The third of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world. Included on the concert are works by Leo Hyun Jung Chang, Hannah M. Brown, Anthony T. Marasco, Travis West and Abe King.
TIES 2016 is sponsored by FACTOR.
Sound Travels Concert: Two Retrospectives: John Oswald and Paul Dolden
By John Oswald and Paul Dolden
August 12, 2016, 7:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
In this concert, works by John Oswald and Paul Dolden - two highly individual and distinguished Canadian artists - will trace how they approach the concept of sonic density through their original use of multi-tracking recording techniques since the 1970’s. Included will be the world premiere by Paul Dolden of Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt, a new work commissioned by NAISA with funding from the Canada Council for the Arts, part of his full length work Music of Another Present Era as well as his works: Below the Walls of Jericho, L’ivresse de la vitesse, and an excerpt from Who Has the Biggest Sound. Also included will be the following works by John Oswald: Vertical Time, Skindling Shadés, and DAB.

Program:
I. Below the Walls of Jericho (1988-89 - remastered 2012) by Paul Dolden
The title is only a loose reference to the story in the bible. What interests me about the story is the idea of a large mass of people knocking down a wall through the use of sound. The story gives credence to the notion of music as a catalyst for social change. Beyond the sheer physical impact that a large number of sounds contain, music is a form of language which is capable of stimulating thought. The power of music lies in the simultaneous physical and intellectual seduction of the listener.

In the composition, four hundred tracks of sound are often assembled to create the sense of a large mass. Three hundred and thirty-three tracks are created by dividing each of the seven octaves into forty-eight notes. Brass, string and wind instruments from the Western musical tradition and from other cultures are combined to create these textures. The remaining tracks are made from unpitched percussion instruments. This working method allows each track to have its own identity in terms of frequency and tempo. The relationship between each individual layer and the mass effect can act as a metaphor for the relationship between the individual and society. Beyond the music, the metaphor suggests questions of the nature of the walls we have to tear down in order for our culture to move forward.

Below the Walls of Jericho was realized in 1988-89 at the composer’s studio and premiered on November 12th, 1989 during the CEC Electroacoustic Days, >convergence< at the Margaret Greenham Theatre of The Banff Centre for the Arts (Alberta, Canada) — as the Berlin wall began to tumble down. The version of this work for percussion and tape, Luminous Hysteresis, was commissioned by percussionist Trevor Tureski with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts (CCA). Below the Walls of Jericho won 1st prize in the Electroacoustic category of the Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition (Bourges, France, 1990). For a list of recorded musicians, visit: http://www.electrocd.com/en/oeuvres/select/?id=13940
II. Who Has the Biggest Sound? (2005-08) by Paul Dolden
Our composer pursues the important questions of the day: Who has the biggest sound?, Who has the nicest melodies?, Who can play the fastest?, and Who has the most complex music? During this quest for the musical Holy Grail the composer is impeded by the sounds of nature, or in this excerpt, by the sound of crickets. The text for the speaker :

“Ay! Carbon! That is enough of these misbehaving bugs. Crazy. Enough of these grasshoppers, these cicadas, what do you think this is? We are listening to music? These bugs drive me crazy, crazy, crazy. Let’s get onto the through composed thoroughfare and hear the Tonic Tango. And hear: Tonic Tango. Let’s get onto the through composed thoroughfare and hear the Tonic Tango.”

The sonic behavior of crickets and cicadas, is everywhere in this excerpt, from the dense percussion to the busy sections of brass and winds. All this music is modeled on the microtonal and polyrhythmic patterns found in the insects. I found the rhythmic behavior of these insects’ often resembled Spanish or South American rhythmic patterns such as Flamenco, Tango, Cha Cha etc. It is no coincidence that Latin music evolved in environments native to cricket sounds. In other words, I am considering the relationship between geography and culture. In other parts of “Who Has….” I visit other musical and geographical areas of the world.
III. L’ivresse de la vitesse (1992-93 - Remastered 2012) by Paul Dolden
The title L’ivresse de la vitesse (Intoxication by Speed) is an allusion towards my current artistic intentions which involve the speeding up of an excess of musical ideas so that the composition and its materials exhaust themselves in the shortest time possible. The intoxicating aspect of speed is evoked by using primarily fast tempo markings and rapid changes in orchestration, density and dynamics. These elements can be particularly sped up to the point of exhaustion and intoxication in the digital audio studio which is limitless or ‘virtual’ in its colour and density possibilities.

To increase the sensation of exhaustion and intoxication, hundreds of musical parts occur simultaneously that are organized by numerous musical systems which unfold concurrently. A few of these musical systems originate in different styles of popular music. These musical styles are organized by an overall compositional language and style in order to diffuse their direct effect or reference point, and to create an internally coherent music. This overall compositional language is intended to make the different musical styles and compositional systems implode inwards, creating new identities beyond their worn-out historical reference points, and to produce what I hope is like seduction: undeniably attractive and yet simultaneously unexplainable. Indeed any work that is totally complicit in its own absorption, so that it no longer makes apparent sense on the surface, will exercise a remarkable fascination. In short, an art work fascinates by its esotericism which preserves it from external logic.

L’ivresse de la vitesse was produced in the composer’s studio with assistamce from the Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) and in particular from a Media Arts Audio Production Grant. It premiered on May 28th, 1994 at the 3rd Annual Festival of Experimental Music organized by the London Musicians’ Collective (UK). L’ivresse de la vitesse was awarded the 2nd Prize at the 3rd Prix international Noroit-Léonce Petitot (Arras, France, 1994); 1st Prize in the Musica Nova 1994 International Competition of Electroacoustic Music (Prague, Czech Republic); 1st Mention in the Stockholm Electronic Arts Award (Sweden, 1994); and the Jean A Chalmers Award for Musical Composition (Toronto, Canada, 1995).
IV. Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt (2016) by Paul Dolden
Commissioned by the NAISA with financial assistance of the Canada Council for the Arts.

Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt is the third movement of a larger 44’ work called Music of Another Present Era. Each movement plays freely with our ability to imagine another time and culture. At the same time, it recognizes that this historical imagining is necessarily conditioned by our own time and place.
Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt , is a musical re-imagining of an ancient Chinese myth:

Today the Chinese call it the Moon Festival. In Tang dynasty, it was a time of national holidays for moon gazing, drinking and merrymaking. Not everyone agreed on what the craters and plains of the lunar surface depicted. For some the moon was the site of an ice palace for the moon goddess and her court. In the folklore of the Tang, a magician escorted Emperor Illustrious August to that palace across a silver bridge that he had conjured up by tossing his staff into the air. During his sojourn there the emperor witnessed a performance of the “Air of the Rainbow Robe and Feathered Skirt” by immortal maids. He memorized the music, and on his return to earth taught it to performers at his palace. The music and dance of this work remains the most famous artifact of the Tang dynasty today.

I have attempted to create a modern version of this work, in which maidens often sing, and dance rhythms abound.
V. Vertical Time (1973, restoration and revision 2012) by John Oswald
These were the ideas i set out to experience in the concocting of Vertical Time in 1973. ??- An idea of black noise. ??- A mediation from the pure simplicity of a single sine tone to the pure complexity of white noise. ??- An aural tapestry intended to compliment visual fields generated from television snow. ??- A mass or cloud of sound that one could move around or through, thus hearing different perspectives of a continuous presence. ??The final sonic environment is achieved through many things, including thick and busy white noise with thousands of sine tones, changing the playback speed of an accumulation of these tones, a swarm of sweeping pitches, a mass of very short blips of pitches, and coloured variations of the sounds. ??In the end i never finalized a composite mix of Vertical Time back then, preferring to have it sound different each playback with the staggering starts of unsynchronized tapes and synth. Almost 40 years later now i've reassembled these parts, recreating some portions which weren't recorded at the time. ??The structure of Vertical Time is based on the banana split sundaes that were (and still are) available at Dairy Queen ice cream stands: three varied peaks and a unifying throughline (the split stereo banana). ??*With the help of Chris Muir and John Abram, and the encouragement of Barry Truax.
VI. Skindling Shadés (1989) by John Oswald
Co-incidentally the composer was gathering recordings of incendiary sounds at the same time choreographers Paula Ravitz and Denise Fujiwara were working on a solo of combustible images, while using, as rehearsal music, a recording of Igor Stravinsky's The Firebird. The co-choreographers asked John Oswald to make a replacement to The Firebird and he had no intention to imitate Stravinsky. ??In addition to actual fire recordings, there are similar sounds (the moving of air, the escaping of gases, the fracture of timber), tromp l'orielle and heat noise swarms. The composer refers to a swarm as a massive overdubbing of a single sound source.
VII. DAB (1989) by John Oswald
From “BAD RELATIONS: plunderography, pop and weird in DAB.”?The source for DAB is entirely the Jackson/Jones/Swedien pop song 'Bad' (Epic EK 40600 DIDP 70643). The transformations come from a limited pallet, which excludes timbral signal processing (filtering, modulation, supplementary synthesis, etc.) pitch shifting, delay reverberation and add-on musicianship. What is left is location in time. Fractional portions of the original music, varying in duration from about 25 milliseconds to phonemes and sonemes, to phrase fragments, have been superimposed and re-juxtaposed in 3 specified sections without pause: Revised, a bridge, and Homogenized. ??DAB varies between a general similarity to its source material and abstraction. It also mediates between pop/rock predictability, the rhythmic idiosyncrasy available to improvisers, and the timbral meditations found in the electroacoustic genre. Totally mechanical routines have been applied to the realizations of musicians who have the studio time to seek perfection. Perfection has been messed with by improvisation. Very popular music meets its extremities.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #4
August 13, 2016, 3:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The fourth of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world. Included on the concert are works by Cody Kauhl, Garrett Hecker, Benjamin McCarthy, Georgios Varoutsos, Hugh Lynch and Leah Reid.
TIES 2016 is sponsored by FACTOR.
Toronto International Electroacoustic Symposium (TIES) Concert #5
August 13, 2016, 7:30 pm

Geary Lane, 360 Geary Avenue, Toronto
General $15, Students $10, (or included with TIES registration)
The last of five concerts which include works chosen by an international jury of electroacoustic practitioners, which provide a snapshot of the latest research and exploration in sound art happening around the world. Included on the concert are works by Carolina Heredia, Navid Bargrizan, Terry Dame, David Su, Kevin Patton, Benjamin Whiting, Christopher Biggs, Sean Peuquet, Mark Zaki, David Jason Snow, Sundar Subramanian and Maxime Corbeil-Perron.
TIES 2016 is sponsored by FACTOR.