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Upcoming Installations

The Piano Travels
By James Bailey
February 3 – April 4, 2022, Thursday to Monday, 10am – 4pm
NAISA North Media Arts Centre, 313 Highway 124, South River
Pay by Donation

The Piano Travels is an interactive sound installation by James Bailey that uses radio transmission and amplification to modify and extend the capabilities of a 1864 Armand upright piano. In this installation, sounds from various parts of the piano will be amplified by different means, including instrument amplifiers and radios, the latter receiving their signals via small low-power transmitters.

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The upright piano has been an entertainment fixture in homes, even those of modest means, for well over a century and has provided music in a way that its manufacturer, as well as tradition, has dictated for many years before that. There are a few adventurous souls however, who have, on occasion, seen fit to extend the instrument's capabilities by modifying its sounding methods by means such as inserting objects between the strings at specific points to alter the tonal properties (John Cage), attaching long lengths of wire to certain strings that are sounded by means of weather events (wind, rain, etc.) (Gordon Monahan), or collecting instruments that have been left to the elements until on the verge of no longer being playable (Ross Bolleter). I myself have engaged in the latter, with a piano that had formerly been used in a NAISA installation by Michelline Roi, wherein she had inserted small speakers inside the body which played recordings of various peoples memories of their experiences with one in their home. In this installation, sounds from various parts of the piano will be amplified by different means, including instrument amplifiers and radios, the latter receiving their signals via small low-power transmitters designed by Tetsuo Kogawa. These external sounding devices will be distributed around the exhibition space as much as cabling and transmission range will allow.

James Bailey is a sonic explorer who has been recording sound pieces since the mid-'70s and performing on occasion since the early '80s. Tape recorders and their manipulation were prominent in the beginning, but eventually electronic modification devices ("stomp boxes") joined the arsenal, and computer effects used in post-recording processing. He has also been known to play objects unmodified by electronics, even "real" instruments, though rarely in a conventional manner.
EMF Turntable
By Shaughn Martel
February 3 – April 4, 2022, Thursday to Monday, 10am – 4pm
NAISA North Media Arts Centre, 313 Highway 124, South River
Pay by Donation
Grounding electronic and technological materials in nature, the EMF Turtable is an interactive sound sculpture by Shaughn Martel that amplifies the electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones and other small electronic devices.
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By pushing the electromagnetic emissions of these devices into the human hearing range the flow of electricity between the components and data transfer between them generates a droning static sound. By spinning the turntable and using the touch screens, visitors can modify the waveform of the electromagnetic field and the resulting sound material of the EMF Turntable. The sculpture was created initially as an instrument to strip the social associations of small consumer electronic devices; to understand them instead as tone generating machines as part of a manual analog instrument.
Shaughn Martel is a Sudbury born and Tkoronto (Toronto) based new media artist. Focusing in the performance of electricity, electronics and human collaborations with it. Their work extends to grounding the mystification of technology in natural phenomena and attempting to augment sensory perception of spaces and forces normally outside the faculties of the body.